About the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

Stewarded by Grand Staircase Escalante Partners

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument spans nearly 1.9 million acres of America’s public lands – more area than the states of Delaware and Rhode Island combined – making it the largest unit of the National Conservation Lands. Located in south-central Utah, it is a geological wonderland of multicolored cliffs, plateaus, mesas, buttes, pinnacles and canyons created over eons of time. The National Monument was the last major region of the lower 48 states to be mapped, and for good reason. From its spectacular Grand Staircase cliffs and terraces, across the rugged Kaiparowits Plateau to the wonders of the Escalante River Canyons, the Monument’s size, resources, and remote character provide extraordinary opportunities for geologists, paleontologists, archeologists, historians, and biologists. In addition to its rich human history, this cliff-strewn landscape is one of the last largely unexplored boneyards from the Age of Dinosaurs. To date, more than two-dozen new dinosaurs have been recovered from these rocks, along with fishes, amphibians, turtles, lizards, crocodiles, mammals, birds, plants and other organisms that lived there over 65 million years ago.

From the blog

  • 04.15.14

    Oil Spill In Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

    On March 22, hikers in southern Utah came upon a distressing sight: a four-mile slick of oil staining the Little Valley Wash, which eventually drains into the Escalante River, inside the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. The spill had not been reported. The hikers sent photos of the leak to staff … read more

  • 03.26.14

    H.R. 1459 – The “Preventing New Parks” Bill, Up For House Vote Today

    Today, a vote for the “Preventing New Parks” bill, (H.R. 1459) stands as a direct assault on our National Parks, National Monuments and public lands conservation heritage. H.R. 1459, the Ensuring Public Involvement in the Creation of National Monuments Act or “EPIC,” spells just that—an epic fail for protecting our … read more

  • 03.3.14

    Historic Photos: A Great Way to Bring Communities Together

    There’s nothing quite like a series of old black and white photographs—of buildings long-gone, unnamed ancestors sitting on a wagon, familiar mountain ranges with cattle grazing in the foreground—to get people talking. And that’s what happened February 12 in the dining room of the Cowboy Blues restaurant in Escalante, when … read more